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Fibromyalgia and Yoga


Patients with a diagnosis of fibromyalgia (80%) were the most likely to try CAM versus those with other pain diagnoses. In multivariate analyses, pain duration emerged as a significant predictor of CAM preferences. For mind-based approaches (i.e. hypnosis, biofeedback and art therapy), pain duration and limitations in family activities were both significant predictors. When given a choice of CAM therapies, this sample of children with chronic pain, irrespective of pain diagnosis, preferred non-invasive approaches that enhanced relaxation and increased somatic control. Longer duration of pain and greater impairment in functioning, particularly during family activities increased the likelihood that such patients agreed to engage in CAM treatments, especially those that were categorized as mind-based modalities.

-- Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2007 Sep;4(3):367-74. Treatment Preferences for CAM in Children with Chronic Pain.Tsao JC, Meldrum M, Kim SC, Jacob MC, Zeltzer LK.

Among the many CAM therapies frequently used by fibromyalgia patients, empirical research data exist to support the use of only three: (1) mind-body, (2) acupuncture, and (3) manipulative therapies for treating fibromyalgia. The strongest data exist for the use of mind-body techniques, particularly when utilized as part of a multidisciplinary approach to treatment. The weakest data exist for manipulative techniques (e.g. chiropractic and massage). The data supporting the use of acupuncture for fibromyalgia are only moderately strong. Also, for some fibromyalgia patients, acupuncture can exacerbate symptoms, further complicating its application for this condition. Further research is needed not only in these three areas, but also for other treatments being frequently utilized by fibromyalgia patients.

-- Baillieres Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol. 1999 Sep;13(3):487-92. Complementary medicine treatments for fibromyalgia syndrome.Berman BM, Swyers JP.

Acupuncture, some herbal and nutritional supplements (magnesium, SAMe) and massage therapy have the best evidence for effectiveness with fibromyalgia syndrome. Other CAM therapies have either been evaluated in only one RCT with positive results (Chlorella, biofeedback, relaxation), in multiple RCTs with mixed results (magnet therapies), or have positive results from studies with methodological flaws (homeopathy, botanical oils, balneotherapy, anthocyanidins, dietary modifications). Lastly, other CAM therapies have neither well-designed studies nor positive results and are not currently recommended for FMS treatment (chiropractic care).

-- Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol. 2003 Aug;17(4):667-83. Complementary and alternative medicine in fibromyalgia and related syndromes.Holdcraft LC, Assefi N, Buchwald D.

Yoga || || Fibromyalgia Center



last update: April 2009



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